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questioning him since yesterday. there is some form of communication between law enforcement and the suspect we believe in writing. pamela brown is outside the hospital for us, she's joining us now. what is the latest on tsarnaev's condition? >> reporter: the latest is that he remains here at beth israel deaconess medical center in serious condition. he is still in the intensive care unit handcuffed to his bed 24/7 monitoring by law enforcement officers. we are told that he is intubated and sedated with a gunshot wound to the neck. so it appears that he is still pretty out of it. wolf. >> doctors are telling us that tsarnaev could put something -- could be getting something that's described as a sedation holiday. i know you've been checking with medical personnel over there. what does that mean? >> reporter: well, i've been talking with our medical correspondent elizabeth cohen and she tells me that essentially this means doctors can decrease the sedation for a few minutes to a few hour so is that doctors or authorities would be able to communicate with the patient. we've seen this before it
the process is under way. >> juliette, from a law enforcement standpoint, do you think it was the right decision to try him in civilian court? >> absolutely. like what jeff said, there is just really no debate about this. it's more of a political debate. for one, the law doesn't even cover him because he's a u.s. citizen. but from a law enforcement national security perspective, what better way to minimize the impact of terrorists than to treat them like criminals. that's what they are. if you make them into sort of a bigger deal than he is or anyone is, it sort of gives them a relevance we actually don't want to. so a lot of people in national security and counterterrorism love this idea. not only because of the legal underpinnings behind it but also because it sort of says to anyone who would harm us, you're just a criminal. >> there has also been a lot of successful prosecutions of terrorist suspects in criminal court. >> you can learn a lot of evidence from this. when i first got into this field it was right after the africa bombings, african embassy bombings in '98, and some of the
will release that videotape in a court of law. they've described it in extensive detail. that's going to be powerful, powerful evidence in a potential trial. tom, thanks very much. let's recap quickly the surviving suspect, dzhokhar tsarnaev, now facing federal charges, among them use gd and conspiring to 0 use a weapon of mass destruction rulgting in death. let's bring in our senior legal analyst jeffrey toobin. jeffrey, what happens next? >> what happens next is that the case will be presented to a grand jury. prosecutors will begin presenting evidence, leading to an indictment. i think the process is going to slow down a great deal. remember, this crime was only a week ago. the government is going to have to assemble a lot of scientific evidence trying to tie material that could be connected to the defendant, to the bomb itself. this is complicated stuff. i think it's going to be months in the grand jury until a final indictment is ready to be presented probably. and then at that point the case will be presented to a trial judge, and there will be motions and then a trial. >> he no
hill later today, when law enforcement officials brief lawmakers. john? >> all right, barbara starr, thanks so much. barbara starr in washington. i want to bring back fran townsend, cnn analyst, former homeland security adviser to president george w. bush. and fran, i want to get your take here. where do you think the investigation stands right now? we've had these initial criminal complaints given dzhokhar tsarnaev. we've seen sort of the case laid out just a little bit. but how about the investigation itself? what are the next steps? >> well, first of all, we know from investigators that they're cooperating with the russians. i talked to sources, federal sources, and the cooperation between russian authorities and the fbi is quite good. both want to understand what they might have missed, what they should have seen, and what they should have made of it as this case is unfolding. you know, there are questions about the older brother tamerlan's travels to russia, what he did and who he met with. those are the sorts of questions that are following up. in the meantime, here in the uni
that it was from law enforcement officials that it may have been from a failed suicide attempt. have we learned anything new specifically on that? >> reporter: we have spoken to the hospital about that, they will not give us any information. i spoke with a boston police chief yesterday, ed davis, and asked him specifically about that. he said he couldn't comment on it. but it is in his neck. it is keeping him from speaking. we know there was gunfire exchange and flash grenades that went off, which has caused dzhokhar tsarnaev to not be able to hear. he's lost part of his hearing. but he fell six to seven feet from the boat and there was lots of blood. with all the questioning and everything you're talking about going on in the hospital and that he's -- he has this wound, and he is under medication, i asked a former fbi agent who worked with group, i said, what kinds of questions are they asking him right now? he says, i would imagine they're asking him about his brother's trips, about the rhetoric, about the associates, about plans, other devices, ultimate plan, others involved, about his dad,
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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